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The Importance of Onboarding New Hires

In this video, Tire Review’s Danielle Hess talks about best practices for employee retention as well as what not to overlook when onboarding a new hire, from the Tire Review Continental Tire Garage Studio at Babcox Media.

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When it comes to hiring a new employee, onboarding is an important part of the process and is necessary for setting up them up with tools for success on the job. In this video, Tire Review’s Danielle Hess talks about best practices for employee retention as well as the things you don’t want to overlook when it comes to properly onboarding a new employee, from the Tire Review Continental Tire Garage Studio at Babcox Media.

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How you onboard a new employee tells them what kind of manager you are and how much you value your employees and your shop culture. It also serves to not only give a new employee practical information they will need on the job, but having that information gives them confidence as they start out in their new role.

Onboarding starts with a Day One orientation where you will introduce your new hire to the owner, general manager, other employees and your HR contact. Meeting the higher-ups on Day One can help make an employee feel valued because the owner or shop manager took time out of their day to meet them. You’ll also want to assign a “buddy” your new hire can go to with any questions.

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Your new employee should also have a copy of the job description. Sit down with them while they review it. The job role may be clear to you, but that doesn’t mean it’s clear to them. Make sure you answer any questions they have about the role then and there.

On Day One, you will also want to give your new hire an employee handbook from HR. This way, they have a place to reference frequently asked questions and it ensures company policies are fully understood.

When your new hire is 30 days into the job, speak to that buddy you assigned to your new hire to discuss how they have been getting along, what questions they’ve had and if there were any questions the buddy was unable to answer. This 30-day discussion should be set up a day or two ahead of time. That way, your new employee has time to prepare for the upcoming meeting. You’ll want to answer any questions they have, and ask if there are any resources they need access to do the job.

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Lastly, give your new employee feedback on how they are doing. And, if there are any developing habits that are of concern, this 30-day period is a good time to nip them in the bud. To end the conversation, ask what you can do personally as their manager to help them be successful in their role.

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