Bridgestone Launches New Bandag B123 FuelTech Retread - Tire Review Magazine

Bridgestone Launches New Bandag B123 FuelTech Retread

Through its rib design, Bridgestone says the Bandag B123 retread is engineered to fight irregular wear and enable longer tread life for fleets.

Bridgestone Americas, Inc. has launched the Bandag B123 FuelTech retread, a trailer retread designed to uniquely complement the Bridgestone R123 Ecopia tire in design and performance.

Through its rib design, Bridgestone says the Bandag B123 retread is engineered to fight irregular wear and enable longer tread life for fleets.

When used together, the Bandag B123 FuelTech retread and Bridgestone R123 Ecopia trailer tire can reduce energy loss by 4.7% and optimize fuel efficiency, the company says.

Bridgestone says it created its Ecopia tire line to offer fleets tire solutions with retreadability benefits engineered with new casing technology to lower rolling resistance and extend treadwear, in addition to meeting SmartWay-verification and California Air Resources Board (CARB) compliance.

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Even as consolidation continues within the North American retread industry, statistics show growth for those retreaders that are investing dollars every year into new processes, equipment and technology that benefit trucking fleets. According to Tire Retread & Repair Information Bureau estimates, the number of retread facilities in the U.S. has decreased by half since 1990.

Even as consolidation continues within the North American retread industry, statistics show growth for those retreaders that are investing dollars every year into new processes, equipment and technology that benefit trucking fleets.
According to Tire Retread & Repair Information Bureau estimates, the number of retread facilities in the U.S. has decreased by half since 1990. Today, the association estimates around 700 retreading plants exist in the U.S. compared to 3,000 in 1990. Yet, TRIB says that the output throughout the years has remained steady.
While retread output has remained fairly solid during the last 15 years, sales of new medium truck tires have increased sharply – especially in recent years – taking a bigger percentage of the replacement market. One market watcher says that in 2000 retreads were “roughly 55%” of the total replacement medium truck tire market.
The RMA estimates that in 2015 there were some 15 million retread truck tire units shipped in the U.S., penetrating 46% of the replacement market. That’s down slightly from 2011, where the RMA’s estimate was 15.3 million retread truck tires, carrying 48% of the replacement market.
For decades, the cost benefit of retreading was obvious; retreads were less costly than new radials for drive and trail axle positions. In recent times, though, that market price advantage has been seriously challenged by Tier 3 and Tier 4 Chinese imports. Even a few Tier 2 brands are coming in below more familiar brands here.
Tire Review’s 2015 TIRES Study showed the average price for a new 11R22.5 was $432.56, while a retread of that size came at an average price of $253.26 – a $179.30 difference, serious money when you’re dealing with thousands of tires.
But there were reports of new Chinese tires (11R22.5) landing here at under $200 per unit. It would be hard for most medium and large size truck fleets to turn away from such a deal, even if it means buying one-and-done tires and landfilling the casings.

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  When I was asked to contribute an article forecasting what the future held for the truck tire retread market during the next 12 months the first thought that came to my mind was “China.” Related Articles – Goodyear sells OTR tire business to Yokohama Rubber for $905M – Yokohama Rubber’s GEOLANDAR G94 tires are

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